Friday, June 19, 2015

Apollo Moon Mission - the world's greatest fraud that reaped trillion$ for the Cabal.

Ever wonder why we could not get back to the moon after 45 years? For starters, what we witnessed through the grainy Tell-Us-Lies_Vision were pre-recorded grade-B studio production videos which were fraudulently broadcast as live (lie) footage. Just like all the 911 lie (live) broadcasts on the morning of Sept 11, 2001. Here are the compilation of all the evidence (lies, astroliars, camera discrepancies, physical impossibilities and just pure fiction).

editor note: this is a continuous compilation. please return to check for updates.

Astronauts gone wild an investigation into the authenticity of the moon landings

(Video+Photo) This Is Why We Never Went Back To The Moon
Published on Friday, 15 May 2015 10:25


“I believe that this nation should commit itself, before this decade is out, of landing a man on the moon and returning him safely to the earth… no single space project in this period will be more impressive to mankind or more important for the long range exploration of space.”

With his speech on May 25, 1961, President John F. Kennedy established the conquest of the Moon as a national goal.

The space program, through NASA, was to have far reaching effects, developing new technologies and forcing the nation’s schools to emphasize the teaching of science and mathematics. It was a dramatic cultural revolution that eventually brought us things like velcro, Star Trek and the internet.

But even before it started, our exploration of the Moon was destined to be short-lived. Despite all the promises and science fiction movies, humans would not build bases on the Moon, mine for minerals or use it as a stepping stone to other planets. In fact, the Moon would soon be forgotten and ignored by space research – why?

Carefully Scripted

The first Moon landing by humans was in 1969 when Apollo 11 took the “giant step for mankind.” The American taxpayers, who spent billions of dollars on the space program, were treated to televised interviews with the astronauts as they sped towards their landing site. Televisions were set up in classrooms and the world watched as this great event happened live before our eyes.

But years after the event, retired astronaut, Buzz Aldrin, revealed that everything we saw and heard was carefully scripted and rehearsed – with the astronauts even using cue cards to describe their impressions of the distant Earth and the surface of the Moon! Apparently NASA was frightened that something might accidentally be revealed to the millions of viewers.

A Stereoscopic method of verifying Apollo lunar surface images
University Kharkivby OLEG OLEYNIKPh.D.c 
Previously of the Department of Physics and Technology
Kharkov State University, Ukraine

The Apollo 15 crew comprised:
  • Commander David R. Scott (Dave)
  • Command Module Pilot Alfred M. Worden
  • Lunar Module Pilot James B. Irwin (Jim)

Fig. 5. Topographic map of the Apollo 15 landing site.
A series of Apollo 15 photographs will be considered and stereoscopic parallax or apparent change in the relative positions of objects will be analysed.

The first series. Astronaut Dave takes a few panorama images in EVA-1 near the LM, AS15-86-11601 andAS15-86-11602.

Fig. 6. The LM with Jim standing at the rear of the rover; the Apennine front and the crater St. George are located in the background. The distance from the camera to the lunar module and rover is about 10 metres, and the Apennines and the crater should be 4-8 kms away. 
A rectangle marks the sections of the photographs which were deducted for parallax examination and separation of 3D objects from any 2D objects.

Fig. 7. The subtraction of the two photos after the transformations of scaling, rotation, and distortion is shown on the left. The right image shows the parallax achieved after merging the two frames.
Nearby objects: the LM, the rover, and astronaut Jim are shifting relative to each other. The Apennines and the crater St. George are also moving as a whole. (Moreover, the shadow is changing on the mountains and the crater.) This finding indicates that it is less than 300 metres to the background (the ‘mountains’) instead of 5 kilometres!

Therefore, with such a small alteration to the camera position in Dave's hands (several tens of centimetres), the mountains should not move, they should remain static (zero parallax).

In addition, the Apollo 15 stereoscopic photos feature a clear separation line between the ‘mountains’ and the foreground. Based on the distance between the camera and rover, the distance to the panorama of the ‘lunar’ scape cannot be more than 150 metres. 

Conclusion: It is very probable that these images were taken on Earth in a studio stage.

The second series. Jim is doing some panoramic photography (Fig. 8). The distance from his camera to the LM is approximately 40 m. Jim's ALSEP Pan at the end of EVA-2.

Fig. 8. On the left Dave collects samples; Mount Hadley; LM in the centre; behind the LM the sun is shining into the camera and the Apennines are in the distance – over 35 kms; the Apennines and the crater St. George are on the right at a distance of 5-8 kms.
The two images with a view of Mount Hadley were selected from the Panorama (distance is about 30 kms, the height more than 2.5 kms) AS15-87-11849 and AS15-87-11850.

Fig. 9. Note the numerous boot prints left by Dave and Jim.
Rectangles highlight the selected areas selected for parallax examination.

Fig. 10. The subtraction of two images after scaling, rotation, and distortion is shown on the left. The stereoscopic image after merging two images is on the right. 
Despite a slight offset of the camera, the mountains are moving, which contradicts the condition of distant mountains. If the image subtraction criteria are changed, the most darkened background condition is replaced with the most darkened front area.

Fig. 11. The subtraction of the front parts of the two images is on the left. The parallax resulting from the two merged images is on the right. This image was obtained by the subtraction of two photos taken with a camera shift of not more than 20 cms. Transformations of scale, rotation, reverse distortion, perspective, shift and the convergence of the two images into a stereoscopic image were applied.
An error estimate is now performed. Assuming that this is a real lunarscape, then the distance from the astronauts to the lunar horizon should be 1.5 kms and the distance to the objects in the background, such as the foot and summit of Mount Hadley, is 20-35 kms.

The offset of 100 sampled pixels below the horizon is calculated – the AB line, obtaining an average shift ± a pixels (depending on the image resolution). The shift magnitude obeys Gaussian distribution, meaning this is noise.

A sample of 50 points is selected above the line (AB), i.e. objects located at a distance of 20-35 kms. Giving an offset value of (10-50)a pixels. The shift direction has a vector and is not subject to Gaussian distribution. Moreover, the higher a dot the greater value of the shift – at the foot it is 10a, at the top 50a pixels.

It is logical to assume that if any lunar objects at the interval [0.01; 1.5] kms are static, the noise amounts to ± a, the parallax is zero, then for more distant objects at the interval [20; 35] kms, the parallax is likewise zero with the same value of noise, i.e. the shift is ± a pixels and the shift value obeys a Gaussian distribution.

However, the results indicate otherwise. Objects above the (AB) line are moving synchronously with increase in shift depending on the height above the horizon.

Conclusion: Mount Hadley moves and ‘bows’. The wrong initial assumption was probably made that this is a real lunarscape. As this research demonstrates, this setting must be a totally artificial panorama, several tens of metres in depth with a mock ‘Hadley’ in the background, moving horizontally and vertically to create an illusionof remoteness and of perspective.

A series of Apollo 15 images are now examined near Rima Hadley for the presence of stereoscopic parallax. Rima Hadley measures in length at least 135 kms, with an average width ~1.2 and average depth ~370 m (from Greeley 1971 – quoted in F. Leverington, 2008).

The third series. Dave and Jim make a few trips in the rover to Rima Hadley (Fig. 12) to collect samples. One of the panoramas comprises photos from AS15-82-11165 to AS15-84-11284.

Fig. 12. Jim is holding the camera. Rima Hadley is in the foreground. Dave is collecting samples near the rover. Mount Hadley is in the background. The sun is shining into the camera in the centre. The Apennines are over 35 kms away. Apennines Front and the crater St. George are on the left. 
(Panorama assembled by the author)
In two panorama frames is the bottom of Rima Hadley, which extends to Apennines Front and the crater St. George. The distance from the camera to Rima edge is about 5 m, to the Apennines and the crater is 4-8 kms. The frames are taken with a shift of no more than a few tens of centimetres. AS15-82-11178 and AS15-82-11179.

Fig. 13. The view of Rima Hadley, Apennines Front and the crater St. George.
Rectangles mark the sections used for parallax examination.

Fig. 14. The foreground subtraction of the two images after scaling, rotation, distortion, shift and perspective is on the left. On the right is the resulting parallax obtained after merging the two frames.
It is possible to see the movement of the surface areas relative to each other along the edge of the trench between points A and B. This situation cannot occur in real world photography. 

Conclusion: These images were probably taken on Earth in a dome-shaped studio location where movable panorama backgrounds were installed, and even treated afterwards by further adjustment in a photographic lab.

Fig. 15. Landscape and Traverse map of Apollo 15 landing site by NASA artist (showing stations 1-14).